Category: Collaboration Methods
June 12th, 2018

The Easy Science of Big Marketing Decisions

Malcolm Gladwell writes that proficiency requires 10,000 hours of experience in a particular field.

The practice of marketing is no different. But why are so many marketing teams—who’ve put in this time and more—struggling with fundamental decisions about what they should be doing to build their business?

The reasons are myriad, but I believe all can be overcome with three easy-to-follow steps designed to generate creative thinking. And while they may strike you as mildly contrarian, each is the result of thousands of man hours of experimentation and, as we in Silicon Valley so gleefully say, failing forward.

Lesson 1. You are not far from an answer. In fact, the answer is in the room with you right now.

I hate to admit it, but many of the core ideas we develop for our clients are not new at all, but rather a creative take on an existing notion they themselves brought to the table.

After all, few outside parties are as close to the material as you. Even fewer fully grasp the intricacies of your organization, product, strategy and industry. And none have spent as much time or energy thinking about the opportunity as you have.

The trick is to harness this power and knowledge and to use it as a source for creative idea generation.

We’ve found the best way to do that is to gather the team that owns the project around a whiteboard and engage in some radical and aggressive brainstorming moderated by an energetic and quizzical third party.

Mortar is a good third party (ahem).  We are not hidebound by or steeped in years of “doing things a certain way.”  Which means we can ask the tough questions of your team in a way that sparks conversation and illuminates what has been ignored or overlooked.

Few problems stand resolute when confronted by individuals who have permission to indulge in wild fantasies and have been granted the power to challenge the (often) unspoken conventions governing any project.

Lesson 2. The secret to thinking big is to first think small.

Big ideas are exciting. They appeal to big egos and satisfy the soul. But they are also hard to identify and articulate, and often slow and difficult to implement.

Small ideas, on the other hand, are easy to grasp. Come in multiples. Appeal to many. Don’t require uniform consensus. Can be easy to extract. Quick to fund. Simple to test. And, because they are so easy to come by, are easily discarded in favor of a more attractive alternative.

The secret is to start small. Identify modest goals. Develop long lists of low hanging fruit. Gather supporters. Test what’s promising. Watch what fails. And use the resulting energy to zero in on the truth.

Thinking small, not thinking big, is a much more manageable way to win friends and innovate successfully in big business.

Lesson 3. Remember to sell the sizzle not the steak.

We call it the pursuit of the A-ha moment.

Every smart marketing decision points towards something surprising and previously unavailable. But don’t fall into the mistake of thinking that your customers will buy your naked claims. Instead spend time thinking about what your audience will find surprising or unexpected. And then root your marketing in those emotions. A better biosensor may provide better data to the care team, but the real joy comes from how they will feel when they realize what they can do with that data.

So, get your team together with someone from the outside and give them permission to think wildly. Pursue multiple small ideas with gusto and passion. And double down on the surprise. Those are the elements of the easy science of big decisions, and the fruits of countless hours in marketing.

March 15th, 2018

Get your marketing priorities straight

Pisa’s famous tower started leaning only five years after construction began in 1173. Erected on unstable soil with a foundation too shallow to support the structure’s weight, the building quickly started to shift. After 800 years of renovation the problem has been fixed and the tower finally stopped listing any further.

Before setting out to make marketing history, it’s always a good idea to survey the decisions you are making about your business foundation. Take care to verify you are standing on solid ground, and you’ll avoid unexpected A-ha Moments.

Looking to build concrete confidence in your marketing efforts? Drop us an email at: heythere@mortaragency.com and we’ll angle you in the right direction.

March 9th, 2018

Great marketing isn’t rocket science

In 1999, NASA lost a 125 million dollar Mars orbiter in outer space. Seems one engineering team used English units of measurement, while another used the metric system. The mismatch prevented the correct transfer of navigational coordinates, and the aircraft missed the red planet entirely.

Before launching any new endeavor (be it marketing, or a mission to Mars), success often depends upon team alignment. The measurement mistake killed NASA’s mission, as well as the engineers’ expected A-ha Moment: a celebration of the craft’s entry into Mars’ orbit.

If you’re planning on entering new space with your marketing, drop us an email at: heythere@mortaragency.com and we’ll make sure the all-stars on your team aren’t light years apart.

March 1st, 2018

Let’s toast to what Prohibition taught us about marketing

In 1920, the 18th amendment passed, banning the production and sale of alcohol. Prohibitionists painted ‘intoxicating liquors’ as sins that led to crime, poverty and death.

Ironically, the biggest winners turned out to be organized crime.

Bold Strategic Decisions may have the best intentions—the mistake is failing to anticipate unintentional consequences. In the case of Prohibition, Americans’ thirst for booze was stronger than their concern for violating the law.

The ultimate lesson of the “Noble Experiment”—and for marketers looking to avoid unwanted A-ha Moments—is to watch out for decisions that end up worse than the problems they are designed to solve.

Drop us an email at: heythere@mortaragency.com if you’re pouring over any bold choices of your own. We’ll show you a quick and easy way to make sure your choices produce the effect you need.

February 6th, 2018

Will your marketing be Titanic in 2018?

Marketed as unsinkable, the RMS Titanic set sail for New York from Southampton, England on April 10, 1912.  To differentiate itself from the competition, Titanic’s owner, White Star Lines chose increased size and opulence over basic safety measures—a decision with tragic consequences.  Four days later, the famed Titanic succumbed to the icy depths of the North Atlantic, taking 1500 souls with it.

Every Strategic Marketing Decision (the first tenet in Mortar’s approach) holds massive potential, and risk, and leads to a different A-ha Moment (tenet #2).  The mistake is not exploring these steps BEFORE you go to market.  Had White Star thought differently about the decisions it made on the drafting table, it might never have become synonymous with arrogance and poor planning. 

The best way to avoid a similar wreck is to engage with Mortar and shore-up that strategy. Check out some of our most successful strategies–and the matching A-ha–right here.